Electroacoustics Toolbox updated to 3.8.3

Electroacoustic’s Toolbox 3.8.3 can now be downloaded from the Mac App Store and from FaberAcoustical.com.

New in version 3.8.3:

  • An issue with channel sensitivity adjustments in the Meter Bridge and Sound Level Meter tools has been addressed.
  • When loading Room Analyzer tools from a project file, if a permissions error occurs for an audio file being used for analysis, an Open dialog will be presented with the file in question selected. Once the file is then manually loaded via the dialog, the permissions will be properly set for the next time the project is loaded. This is an issue with sandboxed copies of Electroacoustics Toolbox downloaded from the Mac App Store.
  • The Room Analyzer tool’s plotting is more reliable when loading the tool from a project file on recent versions of Mac OS X.

SignalScope Pro for Mac has also been updated with the same improvement to the Meter Bridge and Level Meter tools.

 

Download Electroacoustics Toolbox 3.8.3 on the Mac App Store

Download SignalScope Pro 3.8.3 on the Mac App Store

 

Easy calibrated vibration measurements on Mac or iOS

digiducer_04_CE_mediumAlthough Faber Mac and iOS apps have offered excellent sound and vibration analysis tools from the start, the introduction of the Digiducer 333D01 USB Digital Accelerometer makes vibration measurement easier and more portable. When the 333D01 is connected to a Mac, iPhone, or iPad, it will be immediately recognized by our apps and ready for calibrated measurements.

For example, SignalScope Pro will recognize the connected 333D01 as an accelerometer and set the measurement units accordingly. SignalScope Pro will also automatically read calibration information from the 333D01 and establish the appropriate sensitivity so calibrated measurements can be made immediately. This works with both the Mac and iOS versions of SignalScope Pro.

Sensitivity_2_1024x1024

The 333D01 communicates with Mac OS or iOS via the standard USB Audio Class driver. Connecting to a Mac is as simple as plugging the 333D01’s cable into an available USB port. For iOS, Apple’s Lightning to USB Camera Adapter is required.* When connecting to iOS, no additional power source is required, which makes Faber apps and the 333D01 part of an ultraportable vibration measurement system.

digiducer-03

Auto-calibrated measurements with the 333D01 are supported in Electroacoustics Toolbox, SignalScope and SignalScope Pro for Mac, and in IOScopeSignalScope and SignalScope Pro for iOS.

 

Buy the 333D01 USB Digital Accelerometer

Download Electroacoustics Toolbox (Mac)

Download SignalScope Pro (Mac)

Download IOScope (iOS)

Download SignalScope Pro (iOS)

 

*Older iOS devices may require a 30-pin to USB adapter, such as the one available in Apple’s original iPad Camera Connection Kit.

Electroacoustics Toolbox 3.8.2 available for download

Version 3.8.2 of Electroacoustics Toolbox for Mac OS is now available for download from FaberAcoustical.com and on the Mac App Store. This update corrects an issue that could prevent captured data from being successfully exported from the Dual FFT Analyzer tool using the Export All command.

Electroacoustics Toolbox is compatible with Mac OS version 10.7 or later.

Download Electroacoustics Toolbox from FaberAcoustical.com.

Download Electroacoustics Toolbox on the Mac App Store.

Faber Mac apps now support USB measurement mics and accelerometer

Versions 3.8 of SignalScope, SignalScope Pro, and Electroacoustics Toolbox for Mac OS now offer built-in support for USB measurement microphones from miniDSP and Dayton Audio as well as the model 333D01 USB accelerometer from Digiducer.

Each app directly supports the miniDSP UMIK-1 and Dayton UMM-6 USB measurement microphones. Sensitivity calibration data for these mics can be downloaded automatically, just by entering the mic’s serial number. Making calibrated sound level measurements is as easy as plugging in the UMIK-1 or UMM-6, typing in its serial number, and getting started with the analysis tool of your choice (the serial number only needs to be entered once, after which the app will remember the microphone sensitivity). An internet connection is required to download sensitivity information for the microphone.

Each of these apps also directly supports the Digiducer 333D01 USB digital accelerometer, and can automatically load serial number and sensitivity calibration information directly from the device. Making calibrated acceleration measurements is as easy as plugging in the 333D01 and getting started with the analysis tool of your choice.

Various bugs and potential instabilities in each app have been corrected.

These apps all require Mac OS version 10.7 or later.

Electroacoustics Toolbox Screenshot

Electroacoustics Toolbox Screenshot

Downloads:

Download Electroacoustics Toolbox on the Mac App Store

Download Electroacoustics Toolbox trial

Download SignalScope Pro on the Mac App Store

Download SignalScope Pro trial

Download SignalScope on the Mac App Store

Download SignalScope trial

Faber Mac apps are all 64-bit, built for Yosemite

This week, all Faber apps for Mac OS received updates to improve their compatibility with Yosemite (Mac OS 10.10). Electroacoustics Toolbox 3.7, SignalScope Pro 3.7, SignalScope 3.7 and SignalSuite 4.7 are all 64-bit applications that have been built for Yosemite.

The Room Analyzer tool, available for in-app purchase in Electroacoustics Toolbox, now calculates room parameters in whole or 1/3-octave frequency bands from impulse response data that has been sampled at higher sample rates (88.2, 96, 176.4, and 192 kHz), in addition to sample rates of 44.1 and 48 kHz that were supported previously.

The Octave Analyzer tool, found in both Electroacoustics Toolbox and SignalScope Pro, also now supports the higher sample rates for real-time spectral analysis of input signals in whole or 1/3-octave frequency bands.

The Dual FFT Analyzer (only in Electroacoustics Toolbox) and FFT Analyzer tools now support additional dB vertical scale factors of 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, or 18 dB per division in the graphic display.

Various bugs and potential instabilities in each app have been corrected.

These new apps all require Mac OS version 10.7 or later.

Trial versions of each app may be downloaded from FaberAcoustical.com.

Screen Shot 2014-12-03 at 9.35.49 AM

Electroacoustics Toolbox 3.5 adds AppleScript support for room acoustics

Version 3.5 of Electroacoustics Toolbox extends AppleScript support to the Room Analyzer tool (sold separately), which enables automated room acoustics analysis and data retrieval via AppleScript. Now, in addition to automating the acquisition of impulse response data, users can employ AppleScript to control the analysis of that data to extract relevant room acoustics parameters.

With increased automation capabilities, the Room Analyzer tool also now takes additional steps to verify the accuracy of acoustic decay time estimates, including T20, T30, T60, and EDT. For each of these parameters a nonlinearity value (in per mille, or parts per thousand) indicates how close the acoustic decay approaches a straight line, which is the basic assumption in reverberation time estimation. A nonlinearity value greater than 10 suggests that the user might want to take a closer look at the data to determine whether adjustments must be made to the integration limits for the decay curve to get a more accurate measurement.

Version 3.5 also addresses some issues, which include the following:

– Room acoustics parameters are properly plotted across 1/3-octave bands in the Room Analyzer tool.

– Radio buttons are properly deselected in the IR source drawer of the Room Analyzer tool when switching between Dual FFT or Oscilloscope measurements.

A bug has been addressed that could prevent the “Try” buttons in the project window from successfully opening a trial of the Noise Dosimeter or Room Analyzer tool.

RoomAnalyzerScreenshot

Download Electroacoustics Toolbox 3.5 from the Mac App Store.

Download a free trial of Electroacoustics Toolbox 3.5 from FaberAcoustical.com.

 

 

Faber Mac Apps Updated

All Faber apps for Mac have been updated to make more efficient use of resources. Two issues have been corrected which could potentially lead to excessive memory use.

Electroacoustics Toolbox

 

Download a free trial from FaberAcoustical.com:

Download Electroacoustics Toolbox 3.4.2

Download SignalScope Pro 3.1.6

Download SignalScope 3.1.6

Download SignalSuite 4.1.6

 

Download from the Mac App Store:

Download Electroacoustics Toolbox 3.4.2

Download SignalScope Pro 3.1.6

Download SignalScope 3.1.6

Download SignalSuite 4.1.6

 

Faber Mac Apps Updated for Mavericks

All Faber apps for Mac have been updated for Mac OS 10.9, Mavericks. These are minor updates, which include the following improvements:

– This update addresses plot freezing issues on Mac OS 10.9 (Mavericks).

– SLM and Octave Analyzer tools operate more efficiently.

– A potential crash has been addressed in the Signal Generator tool.

Electroacoustics Toolbox 3 Screenshot Electroacoustics Toolbox Screenshot 2

 

Download a free trial from FaberAcoustical.com:

Download Electroacoustics Toolbox 3.4.1

Download SignalScope Pro 3.1.5

Download SignalScope 3.1.5

Download SignalSuite 4.1.5

 

Download from the Mac App Store:

Download Electroacoustics Toolbox 3.4.1

Download SignalScope Pro 3.1.5

Download SignalScope 3.1.5

Download SignalSuite 4.1.5

 

Room acoustics comes to the Mac in Electroacoustics Toolbox 3.2

Have you been looking for a tool to measure the reverberation time, early decay time, clarity and definition of a listening room, auditorium, or concert hall on your Mac? With version 3.2 of Electroacoustics Toolbox, the search has come to an end. Within Electroacoustics Toolbox 3.2 you will find a new room acoustics analyzer tool (sold separately) that puts room acoustics analysis in your grasp.

The new Room Analyzer tool in Electroacoustics Toolbox employs the integrated impulse response method to calculate reverberation time, early decay time, center time, clarity, and definition, as defined in the ISO 3382 standard. The Room Analyzer also allows you to adjust the Schroeder decay curve integration limits with either a click and drag of the mouse or with two independent data cursors. You can plot the calculated room acoustics parameters versus whole or 1/3-octave band center frequency.

Room Analyzer Features:

  • Directly analyze impulse response (IR) data acquired in the Dual FFT Analyzer or Oscilloscope tools.
  • Import impulse responses acquired from other apps and stored in AIF, CAF, or WAV audio files.
  • Export calculated parameter values to CSV, TXT, or MAT files, with the option to include raw IR data.
  • Save impulse response (IR) data to AIF, CAF, or WAV audio files.
  • Save high-resolution plots to PDF files.
  • Analysis
    • Calculate room acoustics parameters according to ISO 3382, including T20, T30, T60, EDT, Ts, C50, C80, D50, and D80, over the entire audio frequency range, or in whole or 1/3-octave bands. Low, mid, and high frequency values for each parameter are also calculated.
    • Plot room parameters versus whole or 1/3-octave center frequency.
    • See the Schroeder decay curve and regression line plotted over the squared IR and manually fine tune the decay curve integration limits.

For whole and 1/3-octave band analysis, the Room Analyzer supports data with sample rates of 44.1 kHz or 48 kHz.

Room Analyzer Screenshot

Electroacoustics Toolbox 3.2 also brings back the Noise Dosimeter tool that was previously available in version 2. The Dosimeter tool is also sold separately.

NoiseDosimeterScreenshot

 

A free trial of Electroacoustics Toolbox is available for download from FaberAcoustical.com.

The Toolbox is also available for download on the Mac App Store.

 

Frequency Response Measurement with SignalScope Pro 3 (Mac)

Measuring the Frequency Response of Your Audio Device

Although SignalScope Pro does not include the Dual FFT Analyzer tool, found in Electroacoustics Toolbox, it is still equipped to perform basic frequency response measurements. This tutorial focuses on using SignalScope Pro’s FFT Analyzer and Signal Generator tools to measure the frequency response of the audio device that you use as an analog interface to measure other systems and devices. If you want to measure the frequency response of a listening room for example, that measurement will be affected by the quality of the audio interface that you are using to make the measurement. Therefore, it is important to know how your measurements will be influenced by your audio interface.

When measuring the properties of some device, like its frequency response, that device is commonly referred to as the “device under test” or DUT. In this case, the DUT is actually the audio device that would normally be used as part of the complete measurement system you use to measure other DUT’s.

Measuring Your Audio Device

  1. Connect your device to your Mac (if necessary, you may want to consult your device’s user guide or owner’s manual).
  2. Using a patch cable that is appropriate for the device you are using, connect one or more outputs of the device to one or more inputs of the same device. Figure 1 demonstrates the connections using an Echo AudioFire4 FireWire interface. It is important to keep in mind that what will be measured in this tutorial is actually the combined frequency response of the input channel, the output channel, and even the patch cable between them.
    AF4
    Figure 1: 1/4″ plug patch cable

     

  3. Launch SignalScope Pro, if necessary.
  4. Create a new project, if one was not created automatically when the program launched.
  5. Click the Device IO button in the project window’s toolbar to open up the Device IO Setup window.
  6. In the Device IO Setup window, click on the name of the device you would like to measure in the Available Devices list. This will display the device’s properties in the lower portion of the window.
  7. Make sure the nominal sample rate is set high enough to capture the desired frequency range. For this tutorial, select 44100 or 48000 Hz.
  8. Select your device from both the Input Device and Output Device popup menus in the project window. If your device does not have both input and output channels, you will need to select one that does, or use the Aggregate Device Editor in the Audio MIDI Setup application to create one. (Audio MIDI Setup is included with Mac OS X in the /Applications/Utilities/ folder.)
  9. Create a new FFT Analyzer tool. This can be accomplished by clicking the “+” button in the FFT Analyzer row of the project toolbox, selecting FFT Analyzer from the Tools menu in the project window’s toolbar, or by selecting New FFT Analyzer from the Tools menu.
  10. Select the Live Inputs tab in the controls drawer at the bottom of the Dual FFT Analyzer window.
  11. In the analyzer table below the Input Device label, the first row will already be pre-filled for Analyzer 1. For Analyzer 1, change the channel in the Input column to match the physical input channel connected in step 2.
    • The name of each analyzer can be edited by double clicking on it within the Channel column of the table, either in the Display tab or in the Live Inputs tab.
  12. If you connected multiple physical input/output channel pairs in step 2, click the “+” button above the analyzer table to add an additional analyzer for each additional channel pair and configure the input channels as in the previous step.
  13. In the FFT tab of the FFT Analyzer’s controls drawer, set the number of spectral lines to a value that will provide the frequency resolution you need. For the purposes of this tutorial, select 4410 spectral lines if your DUT’s sample rate is 44100 Hz or 4800 lines if your sample rate is 48000 Hz.
    • The frequency resolution of your measurement can be determined by the selected frequency span (which is dependent on the sample rate) and the number of spectral lines. You can calculate the frequency resolution by dividing the frequency span by the number of lines (if guardbanding is turned off). For example, if the selected frequency span is 24000 Hz, and the number of lines is 4800, the frequency resolution will be 24000/4800 = 5 Hz. You can also view the current frequency resolution of the analyzer inside the analyzer’s info drawer, which slides out of the right-hand side of the analyzer’s window.
  14. Create a new Signal Generator tool.
  15. Select your DUT in the Output Device popup menu of the Signal Generator’s signal drawer (on the lefthand side of the Signal Generator window).
  16. Select the output channels corresponding to the physical output channels that you connected in step 2. Select the first output channel in the Left Output Channel box, and the second output channel in the Right Output Channel box. If you have connected more than two output channels for a multichannel measurement, you will need to create a new Signal Generator tool for each pair of output channels to be measured.
  17. Click on the Swept Sine (Chirp) tab in the Signal Generator window to display controls for establishing a frequency sweep excitation signal. Configure the swept sine generator as follows:
    • Frequency Sweep: Linear
    • Sweep Direction: Up
    • Lower Frequency: 0
    • Upper Frequency: 22050 or 24000 Hz (The Upper Frequency should be half the selected sample rate, which corresponds to the Nyquist frequency–22050 for 44.1 kHz sampling or 24000 for 48 kHz sampling.)
    • Duration: 8820 samples for 44.1 kHz sampling or 9600 samples for 48 kHz sampling
    • Repeat: Yes
  18. Click the “On” check box to enable the swept sine generator.
  19. Create a new Meter Bridge tool.
  20. Select your device in the Input Device popup menu of the Meter Bridge’s controls drawer (in the Live Inputs tab).
  21. Start the Meter Bridge.
  22. Make sure the Peak level type is selected in the Meter Bridge’s controls, then look to be sure none of the input channels are in danger of clipping (colored red at the top of the meter bar). If any of the input signal levels are too high, reduce the level in the Signal Generator.
  23. Select the FFT Analyzer window again.
  24. Start the FFT Analyzer, either by clicking the start icon in the window’s toolbar, or by selecting Start Analyzer from the Control menu (or by typing Command-R).
  25. Start the generator(s), either by clicking the start icon in the window’s toolbar, or by selecting Start Generator from the Control menu (or by typing Command-R). If you have one or more Signal Generator tools in your project, you can start all of them by selecting Start All Tools from the Control menu.
  26. After everything is running and the measurements have stabilized, you can stop the tools. (If you choose to stop the tools individually, rather than with the Stop All Tools command, it would be best to stop the FFT Analyzer tool(s) first.) Figure 2 shows a plot which shows the frequency response of the Echo AudioFire4. The frequency response of the AudioFire4 is quite flat between 20 Hz and 20 kHz.
    • For more advanced frequency response measurements, including phase response, coherence, group delay, and SNR, or to measure multiple audio devices simultaneously, please consider downloading Electroacoustics Toolbox.
  27. Capture your measurement, either by clicking the capture button in the FFT Analyzer’s toolbar, or by choosing Capture Data from the Control menu.
  28. Save your project so you can review your measurement or export the data at another time.
    Figure 2: Echo AudioFire4 Frequency Response

     

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